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Alfred Hitchcock

Filmography

THE
20'S
The 20'sThe 20's

The Pleasure Garden is a British silent film, and the debut feature of Alfred Hitchcock.


The Mountain Eagle is a British silent film, and Alfred Hitchcock's second as director following The Pleasure Garden.


The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (often just called The Lodger) is a silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It concerns the hunt for a Jack the Ripper type serial killer in London. The wrong man is accused of the crime and is forced to try to prove his innocence.


The Ring is a British, silent, black and white film directed and written by Alfred Hitchcock. The story focused on a love triangle between two men and a woman. It is the only film in his career for which Hitchcock took or was given a full writing credit.

The film, while widely considered a minor work, features photography tricks Hitchcock would use again years later in films like The Man Who Knew Too Much, most notably during the climactic boxing sequences.


Downhill (released in the U.S. as When Boys Leave Home) is a silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and based on the play Down Hill.


The Farmer's Wife is a silent film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It was based on a play of the same name by British novelist, poet and playwright Eden Phillpotts, best known for a series of novels based on Dartmoor, in Devon.


Easy Virtue is a silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and loosely based on a play by Noël Coward.


Champagne is a silent comedy film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on an original story by English writer and critic Walter C. Mycroft. The film is about a young woman forced to get a job after her father tells her he has lost all his money.


The Manxman is a silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Based on a romantic novel by Hall Caine, the director began work on the film just two weeks after the birth of his daughter, Patricia Hitchcock.

This was the last silent film Hitchcock directed before he made the transition to sound film with his next film Blackmail. The Manxman was filmed almost entirely in the small fishing village of Polperro in Cornwall.


Blackmail is a British thriller/drama film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anny Ondra, John Longden, and Cyril Ritchard, and featuring Donald Calthrop, Sara Allgood and Charles Paton.

The film is based on the play Blackmail by Charles Bennett, as adapted by Hitchcock, with dialogue by Benn Levy. Having began production as a silent film, the studio, British International Pictures, decided to convert it to sound during shooting. As an early ‘talkie’, the film is frequently cited by film historians as a landmark film, and is often considered to be the first British sound feature film.


The
30's
The 30'sThe 30's

Juno and the Paycock is a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Barry Fitzgerald, Maire O'Neill, Edward Chapman and Sara Allgood. The film was based on a successful play by Sean O'Casey.


Murder! is based on a novel and play called Enter Sir John by Clemence Dane and Helen Simpson. The film stars Herbert Marshall and Norah Baring.


Elstree Calling is a film directed by Andre Charlot, Jack Hulbert, Paul Murray, and Alfred Hitchcock at Elstree Studios. The film, referred to as “A Cine-Radio Revue” in its original publicity, is a lavish musical film revue and was Britain's answer to the Hollywood revues which had been produced by the major studios in the United States, such as Paramount on Parade (1930) and Hollywood Review of 1929.

The revue has a slim storyline about it being a television broadcast. The film consists of 19 comedy and music vignettes linked by running jokes of an aspiring Shakespearean actor and technical problems with a viewer's TV set.


The Skin Game is based on a play by John Galsworthy. The story revolves around two rival families, the Hillcrests and the Hornblowers, and the disastrous results of the feud between them.


Mary is the German version of Hitchcock's Murder! (1930), shot simultaneously on the same sets with German actors. The film is based on the play Enter Sir John by Clemence Dane and Helen Simpson, and stars Alfred Abel and Olga Tschechowa.


Rich and Strange is a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock during his time in the British film industry. It was adapted by Hitchcock, his wife Alma Reville, and Val Valentine from a novel by Dale Collins.

The film is most notable for the techniques utilized by Hitchcock that would reappear later in his career. Most notable are the sets, including a recreation of a full-sized ship in a water tank used in the final act of the film. The director also experimented with different camera techniques and shot compositions.


Number Seventeen is a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on a stage play by J. Jefferson Farjeon, and starring John Stuart, Anne Grey and Leon M. Lion.

The film is about a group of criminals who committed a jewel robbery and put their money in an old house over a railway leading to the English Channel, the film's title being derived from the house's street number. An outsider stumbles onto this plot and intervenes with the help of a neighbour, a police officer's daughter.


Waltzes from Vienna is a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The film was also called Strauss' Great Waltz. The film tells the story of the writing and performance of The Blue Danube.


The Man Who Knew Too Much is a suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, featuring Peter Lorre, and released by Gaumont British. It was one of the most successful and critically acclaimed films of Hitchcock's British period.


The 39 Steps is the original British thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the adventure novel The Thirty-nine Steps by John Buchan. The film stars Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll.


Secret Agent is a British film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on two stories in Ashenden: Or the British Agent by W. Somerset Maugham. The film starred John Gielgud, Peter Lorre, Madeleine Carroll and Robert Young. Future star Michael Redgrave made a brief, uncredited appearance.


Sabotage, also released as The Woman Alone, is a British thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It was based on Joseph Conrad's novel The Secret Agent. It should not be confused with Hitchcock's film Secret Agent released the same year, or his 1942 film Saboteur.


Young and Innocent (U.S. title: The Girl Was Young) is a British film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Nova Pilbeam, Derrick De Marney and John Longden. It is very loosely based on Josephine Tey's novel A Shilling for Candles (1936).


The Lady Vanishes is a British thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and adapted by Sidney Gilliat and Frank Launder from the 1936 novel The Wheel Spins by Ethel Lina White. It stars Margaret Lockwood, Michael Redgrave, Paul Lukas and Dame May Whitty, and features Cecil Parker, Linden Travers, Naunton Wayne, Basil Radford, Mary Clare, Googie Withers, Catherine Lacey and Sally Stewart.


Jamaica Inn is a film made by Alfred Hitchcock adapted from Daphne du Maurier's novel of the same name, the first of three of du Maurier's works that Hitchcock adapted (the others were her novel Rebecca and short story “The Birds”).


The
40's
The 40'sThe 40's

Rebecca is a psychological/dramatic thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock as his first American project, and his first film produced under his contract with David O. Selznick.

The film's screenplay was an adaptation by Joan Harrison and Robert E. Sherwood from Philip MacDonald and Michael Hogan's adaptation of Daphne du Maurier's 1938 novel of the same name, and was produced by Selznick. It stars Laurence Olivier as Maxim de Winter, as his second wife, and Judith Anderson as his late wife's housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers.


Foreign Correspondent is a American thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock which tells the story of an American reporter who tries to expose enemy spies in Britain, a series of events involving a continent-wide conspiracy that eventually leads to the events of a fictionalized World War II.

It stars Joel McCrea and features Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, George Sanders, Albert Bassermann and Robert Benchley, along with Edmund Gwenn.


Mr. & Mrs. Smith is a screwball comedy film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, written by Norman Krasna, and starring Carole Lombard and Robert Montgomery. It also features Gene Raymond, Jack Carson, Philip Merivale and Lucile Watson.


Suspicion is a romantic psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine as a married couple. It also stars Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Nigel Bruce, Dame May Whitty, Isabel Jeans and Heather Angel.


Saboteur is a Universal Studios film directed by Alfred Hitchcock with a screenplay written by Peter Viertel, Joan Harrison, and Dorothy Parker. The movie stars Priscilla Lane, Robert Cummings, and Norman Lloyd. It should not be confused with a Hitchcock film of a similar title, Sabotage (also known as The Woman Alone, 1936).


Shadow of a Doubt is a American thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and written by Thornton Wilder, Sally Benson and Alma Reville. It stars Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten, MacDonald Carey, Patricia Collinge, Henry Travers and Hume Cronyn.


Lifeboat is an American war film directed by Alfred Hitchcock from a story written by John Steinbeck. The film stars Tallulah Bankhead, William Bendix, Walter Slezak, Mary Anderson, John Hodiak, Henry Hull, Heather Angel, Hume Cronyn and Canada Lee, and is set entirely on a lifeboat.


Spellbound is a psychological mystery thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It tells the story of the new head of a mental asylum who turns out not to be what he claims. The film stars Ingrid Bergman, Gregory Peck, Michael Chekhov and Leo G. Carroll.

It is an adaptation by Angus MacPhail and Ben Hecht of the novel The House of Dr. Edwardes (1927) by Hilary Saint George Saunders and John Palmer (writing as “Francis Beeding”).


Notorious is an American thriller film directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains as three people whose lives become intimately entangled during an espionage operation.


The Paradine Case is a American courtroom drama film, set in England, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and produced by David O. Selznick. The screenplay was written by Selznick and an uncredited Ben Hecht, from an adaptation by Alma Reville and James Bridie of the novel by Robert Smythe Hichens.

The film stars Gregory Peck, Ann Todd, Alida Valli, Charles Laughton, Charles Coburn, Ethel Barrymore and Louis Jourdan. It tells of an English barrister who falls in love with a woman who is accused of murder, and how it affects his relationship with his wife.


Rope is a American thriller film based on the play Rope (1929) by Patrick Hamilton and adapted by Hume Cronyn (treatment) and Arthur Laurents, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and produced by Sidney Bernstein and Hitchcock as the first of their Transatlantic Pictures productions.

Starring James Stewart, John Dall and Farley Granger, it is the first of Hitchcock's Technicolor films, and is notable for taking place in real time and being edited so as to appear as a single continuous shot through the use of long takes.


Under Capricorn is a Alfred Hitchcock film based on a novel by Helen Simpson, with screenplay by James Bridie, and adaptation by Hume Cronyn.

The movie was co-produced by Hitchcock and Sidney Bernstein for their short-lived production company Transatlantic Pictures and released through Warner Bros. The film starred Michael Wilding, Ingrid Bergman, Joseph Cotten, and Margaret Leighton.


The
50's
The 50'sThe 50's

Stage Fright is a British crime film directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock starring Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich, Michael Wilding and Richard Todd. Others in the cast include Alastair Sim, Sybil Thorndike, Kay Walsh, Hitchcock's daughter Patricia Hitchcock in her movie debut and Joyce Grenfell in a humorous vignette.


Strangers on a Train is a American film by the studio Warner Bros. It was produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The film stars Farley Granger, Ruth Roman, Robert Walker, Leo G. Carroll, Patricia Hitchcock and Laura Elliott.


I Confess is a drama film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Montgomery Clift as Fr. Michael William Logan, a Catholic priest, Anne Baxter as Ruth Grandfort, and Karl Malden as Inspector Larrue.

This was the only film Hitchcock made with these three actors. Biographers say he had trouble with “Method” actors such as Clift and Paul Newman, who worked with Hitchcock in Torn Curtain (1966).


Dial M for Murder is a thriller film adapted from a successful stage play and directed by Alfred Hitchcock and released by the Warner Bros.

It stars Ray Milland as a retired tennis pro who wishes to have his wife killed, Grace Kelly as the wife, and Robert Cummings as her paramour. The supporting cast includes John Williams as the police detective who investigates the matter and Anthony Dawson as the man hired to do the killing.


Rear Window is a American suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, written by John Michael Hayes and based on Cornell Woolrich's 1942 short story “It Had to Be Murder”.

Originally released by Paramount Pictures, the film stars James Stewart as a photographer who spies on his neighbors while recuperating from a broken leg; Grace Kelly as his girlfriend; Thelma Ritter as his nurse; Wendell Corey as a police detective; and Raymond Burr as one of the neighbors.


To Catch a Thief is a romantic thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis and John Williams. The movie is set on the French Riviera, and was based on the 1952 novel of the same name by David F. Dodge. The screenplay was written by John Michael Hayes.


The Trouble with Harry is a American black comedy film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on the novel by Jack Trevor Story. It was released in the United States on October 3, 1955, then re-released once the rights were acquired by Universal Pictures in 1984.

The film starred John Forsythe and Edmund Gwenn; Shirley MacLaine and Jerry Mathers co-starred, both in their first film roles.


The Man Who Knew Too Much is a suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart and Doris Day. The film is a remake in widescreen VistaVision and Technicolor of Hitchcock's 1934 film of the same name.


The Wrong Man is a film by Alfred Hitchcock which stars Henry Fonda and Vera Miles. The film is based on a true story of an innocent man charged for a crime he did not commit, even though witnesses swear he is guilty.

The story was based on the book The True Story of Christopher Emmanuel Balestrero by Maxwell Anderson and the article “A Case of Identity” (Life magazine, June 29, 1953) by Herbert Brean.


Vertigo is a American psychological thriller film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring James Stewart, Kim Novak, and Barbara Bel Geddes.

The film was written by Alec Coppel and Samuel A. Taylor, based on a novel by Boileau-Narcejac. A retired police detective, who has acrophobia, is hired as a private investigator to follow the wife of an acquaintance to uncover the mystery of her peculiar behavior.


North by Northwest is a American suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason, and featuring Leo G. Carroll and Martin Landau. The screenplay was written by Ernest Lehman, who wanted to write "the Hitchcock picture to end all Hitchcock pictures".


The
60's
The 60'sThe 60's

Psycho is a American film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The film is based on the screenplay by Joseph Stefano, who adapted it from the 1959 novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The novel was based on the crimes of Wisconsin serial killer Ed Gein.

The film depicts the encounter between a secretary, Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), who is in hiding at a motel after embezzling from her employer, and the motel's owner, Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), and the aftermath of their encounter.


The Birds is a suspense/horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on the 1952 novel The Birds by Daphne du Maurier. It depicts Bodega Bay, California which is, suddenly and for unexplained reasons, the subject of a series of widespread and violent bird attacks over the course of a few days.


Marnie is a psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock and based on the novel of the same name by Winston Graham. The film stars Tippi Hedren and Sean Connery. The original film score was composed by Bernard Herrmann.


Torn Curtain is a American political thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Paul Newman and Julie Andrews.


Topaz is a suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It is a Cold War and spy story, adapted from the book of the same name by Leon Uris and closely based on the 1962 Sapphire Affair (sapphire was replaced by another jewel hence the title) involving French SDECE spy Philippe Thyraud de Vosjoli (a friend of Leon Uris) who “ha[d] played a considerable part in helping the U.S. discover the presence of Russian offensive missiles in Cuba”.

It stars Frederick Stafford, Dany Robin, Claude Jade, Michel Subor, Karin Dor, John Vernon, Michel Piccoli, Philippe Noiret, John Forsythe, Roscoe Lee Browne, and Per-Axel Arosenius.


The
70's
The 70'sThe 70's

Frenzy is a thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and is the penultimate feature film of his extensive career. The film is based upon the novel Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Bern, and was adapted for the screen by Anthony Shaffer. La Bern later expressed his dissatisfaction with Shaffer's adaptation.

The film stars Jon Finch, Alec McCowen and Barry Foster and features Billie Whitelaw, Anna Massey, Barbara Leigh-Hunt, Bernard Cribbins and Vivien Merchant. The original music score was composed by Ron Goodwin.


Family Plot is a American dark comedy/thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, his final film. It stars Barbara Harris, Bruce Dern, William Devane, and Karen Black.

Alfred Hitchcock